Christadelphian Meal-a-Day

Asia-Pacific

Meal-a-Day is a global charity, providing local support and relief to some of the poorest communities in the world.  Since the 1970s, Meal-a-Day has supported hundreds of sustainable projects around the world, run by members of the local community and their supporters – each helping to overcome the effects of hunger, disease, disability and homelessness and vitally, bringing new hope.

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Our Work

In Asia-Pacific, we have so far reached communities in Afghanistan, Bougainville, Cambodia, India, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Thailand and Timor-Leste. We have also recently established partnerships with local community organisations in Vanuatu and are exploring options in other Asia-Pacific countries such as Bangladesh.
Read our 2018 Annual Report

Our portfolio is currently made up of 7 practical projects across 6 countries in Asia-Pacific, working in partnership with local community organisations on the ground in India, Malaysia, Nepal, Thailand, Timor Leste and Vanuatu.

In Asia-Pacific, we have so far reached communities in Afghanistan, Bougainville, Cambodia, India, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, the Philippines, Thailand and Timor-Leste. We have also recently established partnerships with local community organisations in Vanuatu and are exploring options in other Asia-Pacific countries such as Bangladesh.

Our portfolio is currently made up of 7 practical projects across 6 countries in Asia-Pacific, working in partnership with local community organisations on the ground in India, Malaysia, Nepal, Thailand, Timor Leste and Vanuatu.

WaterHarvest

Rajasthan, India

Providing safe, sustainable drinking water for people and livestock in the Dalit region. Educating villagers in improved water management, sanitation and hygiene practices.

Home of Peace

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Local resident, Justine, established the Home of Peace in 1992 to provide shelter and education for girls from squatter families in and around Malaysia’s capital city, Kuala Lumpur.

Karen Hill Tribes Trust

North West Thailand

Working in partnership with The Karen Hill-tribes Trust (KHT), we support the provision of school bus transport, improved dormitory facilities and food for children of families who cannot otherwise afford it.

“The Lord has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to bind up the broken hearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the blind, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour…”

Jesus Christ - fulfilling the prophecy of Isaiah (61:1-3)
 

Our Mission

Together with the other Meal-a-Day regional teams and local communities, we seek to:

Facilitate self-sufficiency through sustainable ‘down-to-earth’ projects
Help to overcome the effects of hunger, disease, disability, destitution and homelessness
Promote agriculture, clean water, basic health-care and education
Encourage sharing, learning and service to others.

The charity is managed by volunteers who give freely of their time, money and expertise. This also means our administrative costs are very low, so we are able to deliver around 92% of income directly to fund these community projects.

But Why?

Meal-a-Day started out as a UK-registered charity, established in 1976: A small group of Christadelphians from Tamworth, UK assembled with the aim of addressing the needs of others, especially in the developing world.  Around that time, the US Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, made a speech concerning the need to try to provide at least “one meal a day” to every person on earth.  This struck a chord with the founding group and so the Meal-a-Day Fund was born.

Locations

Current Projects

Local Partners

Latest News

Check out our Facebook Page to stay up to date with our latest News & Events.

Vimala's Story - Part 4 (Home Of Peace)
After 15 years of living in Home Of Peace (HOP), I would like to say that when you’re a kid, you just don’t know or understand things such as respect, education, self-discipline and self-confidence. When I became adult, I know and understand so much more and I am grateful, so grateful that I actually have a family to go back too in HOP. HOP portrays as a huge family in my life, being a family doesn’t mean being related to someone by blood. It means loving someone unconditionally and with your whole heart. I couldn’t comprehend the reasons as to why I had to be in HOP at first and why things were unfortunate but I am grateful that it happened as it made me look at life differently and without the people who are passionate in their work such as Aunty Justine life would not be a turning point for people such as me.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: ow.ly/LaKy50jZsGx
... See MoreSee Less

Vimalas Story - Part 4 (Home Of Peace)
After 15 years of living in Home Of Peace (HOP), I would like to say that when you’re a kid, you just don’t know or understand things such as respect, education, self-discipline and self-confidence. When I became adult, I know and understand so much more and I am grateful, so grateful that I actually have a family to go back too in HOP.  HOP portrays as a huge family in my life, being a family doesn’t mean being related to someone by blood. It means loving someone unconditionally and with your whole heart. I couldn’t comprehend the reasons as to why I had to be in HOP at first and why things were unfortunate but I am grateful that it happened as it made me look at life differently and without the people who are passionate in their work such as Aunty Justine life would not be a turning point for people such as me. 
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to:  http://ow.ly/LaKy50jZsGx

Vimala's Story - Part 3 (Home Of Peace)
School was tough for me as I had to learn Kindie and Standard 1 syllables while being in Standard 2. I had to attend extra classes till the age of 11. Somehow, I coped and was able to follow along with the rest of the students if not for the extra tuition arranged by Aunty Justine at home.
The secondary school part of my life went by fast and I had to decide the ambition and future of my life. I decided to do Secretarial and Aunty Justine helped to look for sponsor. My college fees were sponsored by a Law Firm. After graduation in year 2009, I went on to work in a legal firm for three months to gain experience and currently I am working as an Admin Assistant in An Architect Firm.
I moved out of HOP at the age of 22 with the basics and foundation that Aunty Justine and HOP gave me, without the help of everyone out there I would not be who and where I am today. I am thankful to everyone that has helped and impacted us at the home.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: ow.ly/dp3730mZOu8
... See MoreSee Less

Vimalas Story - Part 3 (Home Of Peace)
School was tough for me as I had to learn Kindie and Standard 1 syllables while being in Standard 2. I had to attend extra classes till the age of 11. Somehow, I coped and was able to follow along with the rest of the students if not for the extra tuition arranged by Aunty Justine at home.
The secondary school part of my life went by fast and I had to decide the ambition and future of my life. I decided to do Secretarial and Aunty Justine helped to look for sponsor. My college fees were sponsored by a Law Firm. After graduation in year 2009, I went on to work in a legal firm for three months to gain experience and currently I am working as an Admin Assistant in An Architect Firm. 
I moved out of HOP at the age of 22 with the basics and foundation that Aunty Justine and HOP gave me, without the help of everyone out there I would not be who and where I am today. I am thankful to everyone that has helped and impacted us at the home.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: http://ow.ly/dp3730mZOu8

Vimala's story - Part 2 (Home of Peace)
Life with parents and siblings were not as organised as it was in Home Of Peace. Our meals were just junk food with no supervision for healthy food. Play time was every minute and we could do whatever we pleased.
In the first few months of my admission to the home, I was antisocial and still in the hope of my mother coming to collect me home and that this place was just a temporary place for me. However, as days went by I heard nothing from my mother and reality struck me that I was never leaving this new place and that I had to get adapted to this new life in a new place with a lot of new faces too.
I started school at Standard 2 aged 8, struggling to read, write and mingle with those around me. Now, that I had actually gone to school, I learnt that school was not on the school bus instead in a building where teaching classes are conducted and that the bus was just a mode of transport to school.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: ow.ly/kMES30mZOtu
... See MoreSee Less

Vimalas story - Part 2 (Home of Peace)
Life with parents and siblings were not as organised as it was in Home Of Peace. Our meals were just junk food with no supervision for healthy food. Play time was every minute and we could do whatever we pleased.
In the first few months of my admission to the home, I was antisocial and still in the hope of my mother coming to collect me home and that this place was just a temporary place for me. However, as days went by I heard nothing from my mother and reality struck me that I was never leaving this new place and that I had to get adapted to this new life in a new place with a lot of new faces too.
I started school at Standard 2 aged 8, struggling to read, write and mingle with those around me. Now, that I had actually gone to school, I learnt that school was not on the school bus instead in a building where teaching classes are conducted and that the bus was just a mode of transport to school.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: http://ow.ly/kMES30mZOtu

Latest News

Check out our Facebook Page to stay up to date with our latest News & Events.

Vimala's Story - Part 4 (Home Of Peace)
After 15 years of living in Home Of Peace (HOP), I would like to say that when you’re a kid, you just don’t know or understand things such as respect, education, self-discipline and self-confidence. When I became adult, I know and understand so much more and I am grateful, so grateful that I actually have a family to go back too in HOP. HOP portrays as a huge family in my life, being a family doesn’t mean being related to someone by blood. It means loving someone unconditionally and with your whole heart. I couldn’t comprehend the reasons as to why I had to be in HOP at first and why things were unfortunate but I am grateful that it happened as it made me look at life differently and without the people who are passionate in their work such as Aunty Justine life would not be a turning point for people such as me.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: ow.ly/LaKy50jZsGx
... See MoreSee Less

Vimalas Story - Part 4 (Home Of Peace)
After 15 years of living in Home Of Peace (HOP), I would like to say that when you’re a kid, you just don’t know or understand things such as respect, education, self-discipline and self-confidence. When I became adult, I know and understand so much more and I am grateful, so grateful that I actually have a family to go back too in HOP.  HOP portrays as a huge family in my life, being a family doesn’t mean being related to someone by blood. It means loving someone unconditionally and with your whole heart. I couldn’t comprehend the reasons as to why I had to be in HOP at first and why things were unfortunate but I am grateful that it happened as it made me look at life differently and without the people who are passionate in their work such as Aunty Justine life would not be a turning point for people such as me. 
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to:  http://ow.ly/LaKy50jZsGx

Vimala's Story - Part 3 (Home Of Peace)
School was tough for me as I had to learn Kindie and Standard 1 syllables while being in Standard 2. I had to attend extra classes till the age of 11. Somehow, I coped and was able to follow along with the rest of the students if not for the extra tuition arranged by Aunty Justine at home.
The secondary school part of my life went by fast and I had to decide the ambition and future of my life. I decided to do Secretarial and Aunty Justine helped to look for sponsor. My college fees were sponsored by a Law Firm. After graduation in year 2009, I went on to work in a legal firm for three months to gain experience and currently I am working as an Admin Assistant in An Architect Firm.
I moved out of HOP at the age of 22 with the basics and foundation that Aunty Justine and HOP gave me, without the help of everyone out there I would not be who and where I am today. I am thankful to everyone that has helped and impacted us at the home.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: ow.ly/dp3730mZOu8
... See MoreSee Less

Vimalas Story - Part 3 (Home Of Peace)
School was tough for me as I had to learn Kindie and Standard 1 syllables while being in Standard 2. I had to attend extra classes till the age of 11. Somehow, I coped and was able to follow along with the rest of the students if not for the extra tuition arranged by Aunty Justine at home.
The secondary school part of my life went by fast and I had to decide the ambition and future of my life. I decided to do Secretarial and Aunty Justine helped to look for sponsor. My college fees were sponsored by a Law Firm. After graduation in year 2009, I went on to work in a legal firm for three months to gain experience and currently I am working as an Admin Assistant in An Architect Firm. 
I moved out of HOP at the age of 22 with the basics and foundation that Aunty Justine and HOP gave me, without the help of everyone out there I would not be who and where I am today. I am thankful to everyone that has helped and impacted us at the home.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: http://ow.ly/dp3730mZOu8

Vimala's story - Part 2 (Home of Peace)
Life with parents and siblings were not as organised as it was in Home Of Peace. Our meals were just junk food with no supervision for healthy food. Play time was every minute and we could do whatever we pleased.
In the first few months of my admission to the home, I was antisocial and still in the hope of my mother coming to collect me home and that this place was just a temporary place for me. However, as days went by I heard nothing from my mother and reality struck me that I was never leaving this new place and that I had to get adapted to this new life in a new place with a lot of new faces too.
I started school at Standard 2 aged 8, struggling to read, write and mingle with those around me. Now, that I had actually gone to school, I learnt that school was not on the school bus instead in a building where teaching classes are conducted and that the bus was just a mode of transport to school.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: ow.ly/kMES30mZOtu
... See MoreSee Less

Vimalas story - Part 2 (Home of Peace)
Life with parents and siblings were not as organised as it was in Home Of Peace. Our meals were just junk food with no supervision for healthy food. Play time was every minute and we could do whatever we pleased.
In the first few months of my admission to the home, I was antisocial and still in the hope of my mother coming to collect me home and that this place was just a temporary place for me. However, as days went by I heard nothing from my mother and reality struck me that I was never leaving this new place and that I had to get adapted to this new life in a new place with a lot of new faces too.
I started school at Standard 2 aged 8, struggling to read, write and mingle with those around me. Now, that I had actually gone to school, I learnt that school was not on the school bus instead in a building where teaching classes are conducted and that the bus was just a mode of transport to school.
To contribute to this project and others like it, go to: http://ow.ly/kMES30mZOtu

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