Projects

Here you can discover all about the types of projects we support across Asia-Pacific, as well as the key principles used to guide our decision-making:

Current Projects

Our portfolio is currently made up of 11 practical projects across 7 countries in Asia-Pacific, working in partnership with local community organisations on the ground:

India

With a population of just over 1.27 billion, India is the world’s largest democracy and the seventh largest country in the world. It’s geography includes the Himalayan Mountain range and deserts in the north, great alluvial plains (through which run three rivers including the Ganges), highlands (some of which are also at risk of earthquakes) and coastal plains.

In the past decade, the country has witnessed accelerated economic growth and emerged as a global player with the world’s fourth largest economy in purchasing power terms. This growth came after a long period during which business investment was hampered by earlier government policy. While the reforms have resulted in growing wealth, there has been a collapse of the rural economy due to declining investment in the sector, an oversupply of labor and primitive methods of agriculture.

Widely recognised as a country suffering very poor living conditions for millions of its people, poverty levels have decreased in India from around 50% (of the population) in the late seventies to 27% in 2005.  Forty-two per cent of people in rural areas lived below the poverty line in 2004-05. Poverty is compounded by other factors such as corruption, illiteracy, the caste system and complex laws of inheritance which may disadvantage certain groups in society, women in particular.

While relatively small in proportion to the overall population, particular health concerns pose life-threatening problems for large numbers of the population:

  • HIV/AIDS affects an estimated 2.4 million people each year
  • Around 1.7 million are diagnosed with the airborne infection tuberculosis (TB) annually, resulting in approximately 400,000 deaths. This makes it the leading cause of fatalities in the 15 to 45 year age group. 

A number of our projects relate to the treatment of TB and HIV/AIDS and supporting patients and their families in nutrition programs, as well as clean water supply, education and agricultural garden development to build sustainable food supplies and family incomes.

Source: World Bank, US AID
 

Discover more about our projects

Simply follow the links below for more information about each of our projects, the communities they are serving and the positive outcomes to-date...

Ayries Society, Tamil Nadu

Project Description: 

The Ayries Society clinic is situated around an old port town in the district of Cuddalore in Tamil Nadu, in south-east India. Cuddalore, meaning “sea town” in Tamil, is well renowned for its impressive beaches and mangrove forest; yet, in recent times, industrial growth has tarnished this image with that of a polluted city, slowly taking its toll on the local community. TB and HIV/AIDS are two critical conditions suffered by the local population. In October 2011, the Times of India reported that one in four deaths among people with HIV/AIDS was due to TB.

Working with the Ayries Society, we do what we can to help.

One focus in Cuddalore is to provide nutritional and medical support for TB patients and their families who are physically unable to help. The Society has had notable success in treating hundreds of patients with TB, through a programme known as Directly Observed Short Course chemotherapy. The food services include adult nutrition programs and cooked meals and dates for children.

Much of our funding support with Ayries Society goes towards the People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) project. The project provides essential support to affected families. In order to receive antiretroviral treatment for HIV an individual must, after their initial treatment, be able to be released to the care of a trained guardian supported by Ayries. Under the PLHA nutrition programme, the Society provides food ingredients and advice to those beginning anti-retroviral treatment.

 

Sources: World Bank, Times of India
Project Type: 
Nutrition
Healthcare
Beneficiaries: 
Children
Men
Women
Duration From: 
2007
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A12 000.00
Benefits so far: 

Over the past 5 years, 235 people have successfully completed the Short Course Chemotherapy treatment for TB. This treatment is saving lives. Last year there were 46 people cured of TB as a result of this treatment and nutrition supplement.

Around 50 families are helped each year through the PLHA nutrition programme.

Without Meal-a-Day aid and the Ayries Society’s successful outreach to the rural area, the local poor would be unable to obtain these critical services.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

The partnership with Ayries Society was originally established with the UK Meal-a-Day Fund – we have been pleased to continue the working relationship since it was transferred to Asia-Pacific in 2007.

The Ayries Society was founded in 1998 with a small group of young adults doing social work in the local area in India. From 2004 funds came informally from the UK, allowing the Society to diagnose and treat TB patients, although staff were at that time unpaid. Now supported by the Ayries Trust in the UK, the registered charity employs 14 staff, made up of HIV/AIDS counselors, physiotherapy workers, TB technicians and one cook. The Society’s focus is on those affected by TB and HIV/AIDS, as well as children with disabilities who receive support and mobility equipment.

While once reliant on walking, ox carts and public buses, the Society’s staff now uses scooters and a minivan to complete their outreach work.

The Society has received a range of national recognition for its work, including a Gold Medal from the Tamil Nadu Human Rights Vigilance Organisation for its work with children with disabilities and its free rural medical service.

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our India Project Coordinator, Jamie Holder

About the partner organization:

About the country:

Bartimaeus Resource Centre, Bangalore

Project Description: 

In Bangalore, Meal-a-Day supports the work of the Christadelphian-run Bartimeaus Centre for the Visually Impaired. This centre provides educational facilities for blind and partially-sighted young men and women. Disabled people are often rejected and may be perceived as of little value in India. However the training provided at Bartimaeus helps the students become independent and self-sufficient members of society with confidence and character.

During their one year at Bartimaeus, students receive training in four basic areas:

  • Reading and writing Braille
  • Mobility training
  • Computer training
  • Spoken English
Project Type: 
Education
Beneficiaries: 
Men
Women
Duration From: 
2008
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A8 000.00
Benefits so far: 

Bartimaeus Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired looks after the welfare of 14 blind students at a time. Meal-a-Day funding goes towards the 7 full-time staff salaries and facilities costs for the teaching block and student home. These facilities have enabled 56 students to complete training at the centre since Meal-a-Day funding began in 2008.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

Bartimaeus Resource Centre for the Visually Impaired is run locally by Christadelphians in Bangalore, and supported from time-to-time by volunteer field workers from other countries such as Australia and the UK.

Bartimaeus started in Bangalore in 2004 with seven, completely blind or partially sighted students and worked from an empty garage. The centre has since moved to new rented premises and has 14 students and 6 teachers. There is accommodation for 6 men and 6 women in nearby flats for students from rural areas.

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our India Project Coordinator, Jamie Holder

About the partner organization:

About the country:

MV Foundation, Andhra Pradesh

Project Description: 

The Ranga Reddy District surrounds the metro cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad, which together have a population of more than 6.83 million people. Through the effects of globalization, the “concretization of the suburbs” and a real-estate boom, communities have been forced to leave behind agricultural livelihoods and become wage earners in an urban life. The growth of the cities have further degraded the fragile land and reduced the green cover, while a severe loss of ground water has created loss of livelihoods, farmlands & livestock.

Working in partnership with MV Foundation, Meal-a-Day is supporting farmers and landowners through:

  • Technical training on how to prepare nurseries and transplant vegetables
  • Training on organic cultivation and pest management
  • Exposure visits to food festivals and research institutions, where they are taught on how best to get fresh, nutritious vegetables, and the process of carbon sequestration
  • Provision of seeds and vegetables for planting and harvesting.
Project Type: 
Education
Nutrition
Beneficiaries: 
Adults
Men
Women
Duration From: 
2011
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A3 000.00
Benefits so far: 

In 2011 alone, the support of Meal-a-Day enabled the distribution of 70 kilograms of seed to 750 households in 15 villages. Staff of MV Foundation and two farmers attended the food festival and then later the research institute. This knowledge was then used to teach farmers in a number of villages about nutrition, carbon sequestration and methods of cooking to preserve nutrition. Sixty women were also trained on how to create a vegetable rooftop garden.

Farmers have responded positively to program, learning the skills to create kitchen gardens has improved their own nutritious meals, and saving between 400 and 500 rupees a month. Many have shared the benefits of a kitchen garden with their neighbours and relatives.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

This organization, MV Foundation, was recommended to Meal-a-Day Fund by brother Tim Galbraith (ACBM representative, local resident and highly experienced field worker).

The Mamidipudi Venkatarangaiya Foundation, known nationally and internationally as the MV Foundation, was founded in 1981.  Named after Professor Venkatarangaiya, a historian and strong advocate of education, the foundation began as a research institute with an agenda to end child labour and move more children into schools. Since then it has grown to now employ 44 staff and conduct numerous on-the-ground projects in hundreds of villages in the Ranga Reddy district.

With a focus on child education, health and natural resource management, the Foundation has achieved some significant outcomes for those in the rural areas of the district and beyond. Among many others, it:

  • Conducts environment education under the National Green Corps in 50 government schools annually.
  • Successfully established a pilot project for the Government of Andhra Pradesh in Development of Women and Children in Rural Areas (DWCRA). There are about 18,000 women presently involved in the programme.
  • Through its surveying of land, has seen 24,000 acres of unproductive land brought into cultivation. Another 46,000 acres of agriculture land has been successfully protected from being taken over by the government for military projects.
  • Organised 65 farmers’ clubs, funded by the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD), where training is given on modern technologies in agriculture and also on the various schemes provided by the government.
  • Planted 714,000 tree saplings of fuel wood, bio fuels and agro forestry plant in the project area through community mobilisation.
  • 50 bio-gas plants have been constructed and made operational, 3 solar dryers are operated by 3 women’s groups and 17 women’s groups are using solar lanterns in their villages.

The Foundation works closely with government and other NGOs, and has been called on to provide technical assistance in neighbouring countries. 

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our India Project Coordinator, Jamie Holder

About the partner organization:

About the country:

Wells for India, Rajasthan

Project Description: 

Meal-a-Day provides support for for two projects in the Rajasthan region of India.

The first project,  Kotda 2, is in its fifth and final year and focuses on the redevelopment of several existing wells and trained staff involved in water harvesting. The wider project run by local partner, Wells for India, covers seven villages in the remote region of southern Rajasthan. In a recent report, there were 1,121 households with a population of 5,651 – however over 70% of families live in conditions below the poverty line.

Safe, accessible drinking water for people and livestock is being provided through well replenishment and construction, rainwater harvesting and education about sanitation and hygiene. Improved farming practices are being encouraged through the establishment of sustainable irrigation systems, the promotion of water saving devices and educating people about ways to increase farm productivity by working in harmony with the land. Local communities are involved in the projects through committees and self-help groups.

The long-term goal is to develop and increase food and fodder production and increase the capacity of people to generate a livelihood. The project approach is holistic, emphasising the social as well as the technical aspects of development.

 

The second project, PKS Charasada, is focused on providing water harvesting systems for families in the form of 120 roof rainwater harvesting tanks - to increase the availability and accessibility of drinking water.  This has come about as the villages in the Sambhar Salt Lakes area face a challenge of the decreasing availability of drinkable water. The repeated failure of the monsoon led the government to declare, in 2009, an 80% drought. Recurrent droughts have compounded the high salinity and fluoride levels in the region's ground water. The water is undrinkable for humans and cattle, and of no use for irrigation.

The project design reflects the urgent need to address the problem of drinking water availability. Other challenges - such as water for agricultural use - we hope will be addressed in future projects. The project will use locally sourced marterial that can be easily renewed each year. One storage tank will be able to meet a family's needs for 6 months.

 

Project Type: 
Sanitation
Infrastructure
Beneficiaries: 
Children
Teenagers
Adults
Duration From: 
2011
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A10 000.00
Benefits so far: 

Kotda 2 - In the overall project, 12 wells have been repaired so far out of a planned 65. 3000 people in 500 families have increased access to a safe and reliable drinking water source as a result. In Padlai village, a check weir has retained moisture in the soil, allowing villagers to plant a mustard crop. Two further check weirs have been built and 15 to 20 families are benefiting from these.

As part of this overall project, Meal-a-Day has specifically supported the re-development ofa number of existing wells and the salary of a community organiser for water harvesting. Each reconditioned well provides water to 5 to 8 families. 

For instance, reconditioning a well in Kutamariya village has enabled five families to irrigate six hectares of land for the first time and also harvest a crop of winter wheat and a vegetable crop (rather than just one unreliable summer maize harvest). Unlike other years, they did not have to migrate to the city for work.

PKS Charasada - The project was launched on October 2012. A 21-member Village Development Committee (VDC) has been formed and a survey conducted to identify those who most urgently need project help.

The first of the roof rainwater harvesting tanks have been installed, with a widow in the village being one of the first to benefit. Choti Devi and her son, Mavaram, look forward to drinking and cooking with safe water.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

Our partner, Wells for India, is a well-recognized NGO which is dedicated to improving the lives of those in Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. They run a range of programs that focus on education, health-care, sanitation, livelihoods and natural resources management for the less fortunate in society.

Similar to a number of our partner organizations, the UK Meal-a-Day Fund had developed a longer-term partnership with Wells for India. Based on the successful outcomes they had witnessed, the UK team were pleased to recommend Wells for India to Asia-Pacific Meal-a-Day to continue the partnership from a local region perspective.

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our India Project Coordinator, Jamie Holder

About the partner organization:

About the country:

Malaysia

Malaysia is a resource-rich peninsula bordering Thailand, Indonesia and Brunei, and is known for its attractive beaches, tropical islands, rainforests and mountain regions. The Federation of Malaysia achieved independence from Britain in 1957 and has had one of the highest performing economic records in Asia, with GDP growing an average 6.5% for almost 50 years. The economy has traditionally been fuelled by its natural resources, but is expanding in the sectors of science, tourism, commerce and medical tourism.

Malaysia is a multinational and multicultural country with a very diverse population of 28 million people. Malays and several indigenous groups make up half of the population. Ethnic Chinese, the second-largest ethnic group, make up 25% percent of the population. They have been dominant in trade and business since the 20th century. Indians make up 7% and various other groups account for the remaining 9%.

Malaysia has reduced poverty substantially (from 15% in 1989 to just under 4% in 2009) but been less successful in reducing income inequality, which fell steadily for two decades since 1970 but has stagnated at high levels ever since. The level of poverty within a particular community is typically influenced by factors such as the type of work, which sector of the economy people work in, whether they live in urban or rural areas and their level of education.

Sources: World Bank, nationsencyclopedia.com, Malaysian Department of Statistics, Worldatlas.com
 

Discover more about our projects

Simply follow the links below for more information about each of our projects, the communities they are serving and the positive outcomes to-date..

Home of Peace, Kuala Lumpur

Project Description: 

Local resident, Justine, established the Home of Peace in 1992 to provide shelter and education for girls from squatter families in and around Malaysia's capital city, Kuala Lumpur.

The main objectives of the home are to tend to the physical and emotional needs of abused, neglected and orphaned children, to ensure these children receive formal education and to equip them to help their families who are still living in squatter areas.

The Home has been a haven of safety, health and care for seventeen girls over the past 19 years, with the eldest now working and living independently. A larger home was purchased in 2007 as the original small home had been outgrown. This is testament to the dedication of Justine and her team, given she started the home with just two girls in her care.

A normal week day starts at 5.00am - the girls get dressed, have breakfast, pack bags and lunch before going to school. The three youngest stay with Justine for home preschool. Each Sunday the children enjoy Sunday school followed by a quiet day home to allow parents to visit, although sadly this is rarely taken up given the difficult family circumstances many of the children come from.

Audio File: 
Project Type: 
Education
Nutrition
Healthcare
Accommodation
Beneficiaries: 
Girls
Duration From: 
2011
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A3 000.00
Benefits so far: 

Meal-a-Day supported the yearly tuition costs of two teachers for the girls, medical care for common sicknesses like colds and flu as well as two educational field trips in school holidays. Extra tuition is vital in helping the girls with their school work and potentially weaker areas of study. Two excursions were taken to the Cameron Highlands Tea Factory and the Bukit Merah where baby orangutans, an endangered species, are being looked after.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established groups and organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

The Home of Peace was reliably recommended to us by members of the Christadelphian community, Glenn and Paquita Kennett who have lived and worked in Kuala Lumpur and were particularly impressed by the work and care of Justine and her team of supporters. The Home of Peace is governed locally by a committee, three trustees and four ordinary members, and the daily running of the home is overseen by the secretary.

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our Project Coordinators, Jon and Sarah Fry 

About the country:

Myanmar

Myanmar (formerly Burma) is a country bordering Thailand, China and India on the Indian Ocean and is home to over 54 million people, a largely Buddhist population. It is dominated in the south by the Irrawaddy River System and an archipelago of over 800 islands which are largely uninhabited.

Myanmar is among the poorest countries in South East Asia with almost one third of its people living in poverty. Lack of investment in social programs, health services and education continues to take its toll: On nutrition alone, US government figures estimate almost 30 per cent of children under five are underweight, amongst the world’s worst malnutrition rates. 

Myanmar, "the Golden Country", gained its independence from India in 1948 and has been ruled by a military government since 1962. Economic policy led to chronic inflation and near economic collapse in 1988, which caused mass protests that came close to overthrowing the government of the time. Since then, the military attempted to open up the economy to market forces and foreign investment with little success to-date. Myanmar’s development remains severely constrained by a lack of progress towards real democracy, economic reform and improved service delivery. Ongoing conflict has resulted in refugee populations fleeing to neighbouring countries with estimates of between 500,000 and up to one million people internally displaced.

Sources: AusAID, BBC, www.irrawaddy.org, worldatlas.com, www.cia.com
 

Discover more about our projects

Simply follow the links below for more information about each of our projects, the communities they are serving and the positive outcomes to-date..

Migrant Workers Nutrition Project, Yangon

Project Description: 

Yangon, the former capital, is home to a growing number of manufacturing workers who arrive from poor countryside areas. Both work and living conditions for these ‘migrant workers’ are sub-standard. With the typical wage only $1US a day, workers are unable to provide nutritious food for their children. Together with the very low amount being spent on health, this poor nutrition contributes to high death rates from diarrohea, malaria and malnutrition, particularly in minority ethnic groups.

Meal-a-Day worked in partnership with the Christadelphian Bethezer Fund, to improve the nutrition of the children, increasing their intake of essential vitamins and minerals, and thereby developing their overall health.

The Yangon Nutrition Supplement Project (now concluded in 2012) provided an egg and portion of milk to school-aged children of manufacturing workers, orphans and children with HIV/AIDS. The supplement was provided three days a week, 44 weeks a year by a local volunteer organization which also offers childcare, tutoring and other support services.

Project Type: 
Nutrition
Beneficiaries: 
Boys
Girls
Duration From: 
2011
Duration To: 
2012
Target Budget: 
$A6 000.00
Benefits so far: 

The project has seen 350 children receive an egg and portion of milk on an ongoing basis. It is reported that 235 of these children attend the before- and after-school centres run by the voluntary organization, while 115 orphans and children affected by HIV/AIDS make up the remaining numbers.

PLEASE NOTE: This project has now concluded, and we look forward to identifying further opportunities in this area.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

This pilot project was supported jointly by the Christadelphian Bethezer Fund (main project sponsor, founded in January 2008 and supported by ACBM representatives for Myanmar and Thailand), and the Christadelphian Meal-a-Day Fund. The egg and milk were provided locally to the children by the Probo One volunteer organization, located in-country. The small organization, connected with the Myanmar Council of Churches, provides a range of services to children of migrant worker families and other disadvantaged people. These include childcare, tutoring of school children, counselling and health education.

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our Project Coordinators, Jon and Sarah Fry

About the (funding) partner organization:

About the country:

Nepal

The Kingdom of Nepal is a landlocked country situated between India and China's Tibetan Autonomous region. Nepal is famous for The Himalayan Mountains which are home to the world's tallest mountain, Mount Everest. There is also the Hills region which includes the capital of Katmandu in the middle and the Flat lands of the Terai in the south – these three areas have a total of 50 ethnic groups whose agricultural methods and lifestyles are adapted to suit their respective environments.

Political instability has been a key feature of the Nepali state during the last two decades: Nepal has had 20 governments since the introduction of democracy in 1990 and the country is still emerging from a violent 10-year conflict. The transition to peace and stability is slowly occurring and progress has been made on several social fronts. However, inequality, discrimination and a lack of basic services still makes life difficult for many who were exposed to exploitation and abuse during the conflict period:

  • Thirty-seven per cent of the nation’s 29 million people live in severe poverty, according to UN figures
  • More than half, 55 per cent, live below the international poverty line
  • The literacy rate is only 59% compared to countries like Malaysia and Thailand whose rates are upwards of 90%.

Furthermore, Nepal's economic policy, logistical limitations (due to geography) and an absence of supporting infrastructure have tended to constrain foreign investment, especially in the manufacturing sector.

Sources: Ausaid, World Bank, DFAT, UN Multidimensional Poverty Index
 

Discover more about our projects

Simply follow the links below for more information about each of our projects, the communities they are serving and the positive outcomes to-date..

Heritage Children, Bhujel

Project Description: 

The town of Bhujel sits 6,500 metres above sea-level, in a rough mountainous area about 26 km from the capital Kathmandu. The remote farming community of about 80 people typically rely on maize, millet and potatoes for sustenance. The town’s economy is based solely on agriculture, and as a result parents often have their children working on the land rather than attending school.

Most of the population have little or no access to schooling; they live in mud and thatch homes with very basic sanitation and open-pit latrines. Daily living requires hard manual labour, and often poor health conditions such as asthma and hepatitis take their toll, leaving orphans to be supported by siblings or extended family.

Working with brother Peter Fry (UK) and local Nepalese community leaders, Meal-a-Day has been providing support for children from Bhujel to continue to attend school, including provision of educational resources.

There are also currently considerations for the possible funding of infrastructure including protective perimeter fencing and sanitation services for the town’s orphanage

Project Type: 
Education
Beneficiaries: 
Boys
Girls
Duration From: 
2010
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A2 500.00
Benefits so far: 

Meal-a-Day to-date has been able to support the education of 8 children in this small remote community.

An education is an opportunity for a child to be literate in a largely illiterate country. The funding is designed to promote learning rather than only manual labour as an option for these Nepalese children. It also provides the children with opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have - when they leave school they may choose to pursue further education and/or a greater variety of vocations.

School reports show students to be performing well, even under these difficult circumstances.

Our work with Heritage Children has also involved supporting the development of the Bhujel Orphanage. In 2012 Meal-a-Day funded the construction of permiter fencing, using local materials and labourers - providing security for the children and ensuring the orphanage boundaries are secure.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

Heritage Children is a UK-registered Christadelphian charity which has been active in Nepal since 2005, lead by brother Peter Fry from the UK. The funding is managed on the ground by Mr and Mrs Keshab and Shushma Regmi, “who have a proven record over 20 years in managing charitable projects in Nepal”, says Heritage’s secretary Peter Fry who visits the Nepalese communities on a regular basis.

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our Project Coordinators, Jacob & Johanna Morgan

About the country:

Tibetan Refugee Community Development, Various Camps

Project Description: 

Nepal is a place of refuge to more than 20,000 Tibetans who have been leaving their homeland since the conflict with the Chinese government escalated in 1959, the year the Dalai Lama fled the country. They have been ‘settled’ for more than 50 years in basic camps set up by the UN refugee agency however the majority have no defined legal status. Global Press Institute reports that those who arrived before 1990 have still not received refugee cards; this uncertainty affects the ability to find gainful employment.

Meal-a-Day helps fund a number of refugee development projects in a partnership originally set-up with UK Meal-a-Day and Trek-Aid, we are pleased to now continue the work from the Asia-Pacific region.

  • Meal-a-Day is currently helping the refugees equip the community kitchens in the Tashi Gang and Paljorling camps. The community kitchens perform a dual function as an important place to draw the community together for regular communal meals and also providing food and nutrition for the elderly and ill within the communities.
  • In Paljorling and Jampaling, many of the refugee women seek to work during the day, including agricultural labour or weaving. This is important to supplement their otherwise limited incomes. Meal-a-Day helps support the provision of a nursery teacher in the camp, as well as other aspects of the nursery operations, to allow women the opportunity to seek daily employment. 
  • In the Tashiling camp, the Elderly people's nutrition program is funded by Meal-a-Day. The program provides bi-monthly meals to all the elderly citizens of the camp. These meals are highly nutritional and sustaining for the aged within the Tashiling Tibetan community.
  • Medical grants are provided to refugees from a cluster of five refugee communities in and near to Pokhara, west Nepal. These grants help refugee patients pay for tests, medicines and hospital treatments that would otherwise be unaffordable.
Project Type: 
Education
Sanitation
Healthcare
Nursery Care
Beneficiaries: 
Children
Teenagers
Adults
Duration From: 
2009
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A13 000.00
Benefits so far: 

The medical grants assisted 74 patients in a recent funding cycle. Patients ranged from 18 to 88 years old and had a wide range of illnesses including gastroenteritis, dysentery, cataract eye operations and osteoarthritis.

Grants to help the ill get treatment to return them to health is complemented by the environmental and sanitation projects, which have helped keep the refugee camps clean and minimize disease and infection.

Our recent education assistance program helped 35 students each year prepare for and improve performance in their exams. While they are studying, working mothers can contribute financially to their families as the nursery cares for their young children.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

Trek Aid, a UK-registered charity, has been helping Tibetan refugees in Nepal and India for several decades and has been working in partnership with the UK Meal-a-Day Fund for many years before transition to Asia-Pacific. Trek Aid have a wide ranging program agenda, including health, education and support for the elderly as well as new refugees. Trek Aid also organizes and runs expeditions in the Himalayas, with nearly 40 years experience in the region. They were the first trekking company to do aid treks and projects, and the first to train Sherpas in eco-protection. 

Meal-a-Day funds, together with those of other families and groups with a connection to the Tibetan refugee community, help Trek Aid work with volunteers and medical, educational and other aid staff to achieve their aims. In Paljorling, for instance, Trek Aid supports the Settlement Youth Committee in its camp clean-up events.

More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

    • Contact our Project Coordinators, Jacob & Johanna Morgan

About the partner organization:

About the country:

Thailand

Thailand is a country bordered by ocean, sea and mountains and is home to approximately 69 million people, a largely Buddhist population. It is the only country in Southeast Asia to avoid colonization and has a rich history dating back to the establishment of the Thai Kingdom in the 14th century. Thousands of tourists flock to Thailand each year to see its natural beauty and ancient relics.

Thailand is a relatively newly industrialized country - from the 1970s until the early 1990s the poor were mostly agricultural workers in the rural areas. However as the economy shifted from an agrian economy to an industrialized economy, resources shifted to the industrial sector, reducing the demand for farm and agricultural workers.

The economic growth between the 1980s and 1990s has improved overall living conditions however the benefits of this national affluence have not been distributed equitably: 8% (est. over 5 million) of the population still lives below the poverty line, particularly communities in remote rural areas. Furthermore, Thailand has also been impacted by refugees fleeing from the conflict in its northern neighbour, Myanmar, seeking refuge in the northern regions of Thailand.

Sources: AusAID, Worldbank, nationsencyclopedia.com, worldatlas.com
 

Discover more about our projects

Simply follow the links below for more information about each of our projects, the communities they are serving and the positive outcomes to-date..

Karen Hilltribes Community Project, north-west Thailand

Project Description: 

Getting to school can be a challenge for Karen children who live in poor conditions in the remote mountainous region of northern Thailand. Most villages have a primary school within 10 kms of the village, secondary schools can be 50 kms away and High Schools even further.

Official statistics in 2007 show that only 25% of Karen children reach secondary school through lack of funds or accessible facilities. Dormitories are often situated in the school grounds or nearby, but they are poorly constructed, overcrowded and under-resourced.

Working in partnership with The Karen Hill-tribes Trust (KHT), we support the provision of school bus transport (1 of 20 buses), improved dormitory facilities and food (rice-based) for children of families who cannot otherwise afford it.

Project Type: 
Education
Nutrition
Transport
Beneficiaries: 
Teenagers
Boys
Girls
Duration From: 
2007
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A10 000.00
Benefits so far: 

This year 305 students from 5 poor villages in the hills have been provided with lunch each day. This not only provides essential nutrition, but helps the students study and learn better hence enhance their future prospects.

Meal-a-Day also funds 1 of 20 school buses provided by KHT to enable the children to access schooling and education each day.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

In Thailand, we have a built a partnership with the Karen Hilltribes Trust over a number of years, starting back when the Meal-a-Day Fund was run solely from the UK.

The Karen Hilltribes Trust (KHT), a UK-based charity, was founded by Penelope Worsley in 1999 after the tragic death of her son Richard Worsley, who had previously spent six months volunteering with the Karen people. The Trust's vision is to "see the Karen people empowered to help themselves in a sustainable way" and is being realised through 3 key developmental objectives:

  • To improve health
  • To improve education
  • To create income generation
More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our Project Coordinators, Jon and Sarah Fry

About the partner organization:

About the country:

The Philippines

The Philippines is positioned on the western edge of the Pacific Ocean, north of Malaysia, and is the second largest archipelago on the planet with over 7000 islands. It has been a Spanish and then American colony, gaining independence in 1946. The 93 million people in the Philippines predominantly speak Filipino and the main religion is Catholicism.

The global financial crisis, food and oil price rises and conflict occurring in some regions have contributed to poverty and inequality. Approximately 26% of the population live below the poverty line (totally around 24 million people). The growth of the economy has been typically characterized by boom and bust cycles and current episodes of moderate economic growth have had a limited impact on alleviating poverty.

The Philippines is also located on the Pacific Ring of Fire, meaning it is prone to earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other natural disasters. The Philippines lost around 30% of its forests over the last century, and although the rate of deforestation has dramatically declined there were a number of contributing factors including excessive logging, natural disasters, changing land use, urbanization, fires and poor reforestation. Such significant loss of tree cover has arguably made the Philippines more susceptible to natural disasters.

Source: AusAID, Worldbank, inderscience.com, gaiadiscovery.com
 

Discover more about our projects

Simply follow the links below for more information about each of our projects, the communities they are serving and the positive outcomes to-date..

Climate Resilience in Water Stressed Communities, Leyte

For more information, contact our Project Coordinator, Kirsten Twine

Timor Leste

Timor Leste is an island ringed by miles of sandy beaches and blue-green sea, which lies between the South China Sea and Indian Ocean. Forest covered mountains rise sharply inland, making it a place of impressive natural beauty. Timor Leste has a population of over 1 million people (predominantly Catholic based on its Portugese heritage) who reside in approximately half of the island of Timor - an island which neighbours Australia and Indonesia. The island was colonized by Portugal for over 400 years before Indonesia’s highly volatile occupation in 1975. Two decades of struggle for independence followed with the island finally gaining independence in 1999, formalized in 2002, although there continues to be political and civil unrest.

One of the world's ‘newest’ nations, Timor Leste is also one of the world's poorest - with basic income, health and literary levels comparable to those in sub-Saharan Africa. For instance, in 2007, 50% of the population lived below the poverty line, whilst in 2012 approximately 54% of children under 5 years-old are malnourished. Infrastructure in urban and rural areas requires significant development, whilst unemployment and underemployment combined are estimated to be as high as 70%.

Sources: AusAID, US Department of State, worldatlas.com, HIAM Health
 

Discover more about our projects

Simply follow the links below for more information about each of our projects, the communities they are serving and the positive outcomes to-date..

Family garden development, Dili

Project Description: 

Appreciating the current socio-economic conditions, many parents lack the skills, support and finances to establish a productive garden themselves. The Family Gardens program helps ensure food security for families and also give them the possibility of a cash income from surplus produce.

Working in partnership with HIAM Health, staff provide practical support and finance for extended families to design, construct and plant kitchen gardens. This includes the provision of tools, seeds and seedlings plus cement and bricks for water tanks. Ongoing assistance will also be provided to ensure that produce is harvested correctly and marketed as effectively as possible.

Project Type: 
Education
Nutrition
Beneficiaries: 
Children
Women
Duration From: 
2012
Duration To: 
Current
Target Budget: 
$A2 000.00
Benefits so far: 

This program is our newest to Meal-a-Day Asia-Pacific and is currently in pilot stage; it is expected to be completed in 2014. Gardens have the potential to help up to 70 people per family through both fruitful produce, food security and source of income.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

HIAM Health was recommended by a colleague of our Asia-Pacific management team with first-hand experience of their work in Timor Leste. HIAM Health is a NGO based in Dili that provides education, rehabilitation and nutrition for families in order to reduce infant and maternal mortality and the social and economic conditions families are living in. HIAM currently employs 40 nationals and is a residential learning centre that provides:

  • Malnutrition rehabilitation and education for children and parents/caregivers
  • A Home Kitchen Garden program where people learn theoretical and practical skills about establishing and maintaining an all season organic permaculture garden
  • Outreach to nearby Atauro Island with a supplementary feeding and growth monitoring program
  • The Family Gardens program
  • 'Train the Trainer' nutrition courses for influential village women.
More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our Project Coordinator, Jess West

About the partner organization:

About the country:

Our Project Funding Principles

When considering new projects and/or enhancements to existing projects we base our decision-making on the following principles:

  • Given the increasing number of project proposals we receive, preference will be given to those that come with strong recommendations from existing partner organisations and/or our Meal-a-Day network
  • The project must respond to at least one of these key areas of support, with the focus on sustainable development (i.e. not simply welfare assistance):
      • Food and nutrition
      • Water and sanitation
      • Agriculture
      • Education
      • Healthcare and medical aid
  • Directly benefit fragile and poor societies
  • Be sensitive to local culture and appreciate the context of the difficulties it is seeking to overcome 
  • The project must be willing to have CMaD representatives make on-site visits; these offer a great opportunity to strengthen community partnerships, meet the Fund beneficiaries, review project progress and potentially identify other development opportunities too 
  • Donations must be specifically acknowledged as being from the Christadelphian Meal-a-Day Fund (for financial auditing purposes) and publicity to demonstrate Australian-based support
  • Regular feedback on the progress of the project is required, to ensure it is delivering its intended benefits and outcomes.

Note: Whilst we are acutely aware of and personally respond to emergency and disaster relief situations (e.g. earthquakes), at this stage our primary focus as a charitable Fund is on sustainable development projects, which deliver long-term benefit to communities

Past Projects

This is where you will find past Meal-a-day Asia projects

Agricultural training centre, Capas, Philippines

Project Description: 

Our affiliate in the US, Meal-a-Day of the Americas, has worked extensively in partnership with an organization called Green Empowerment in South America.

Since Meal-a-Day Americas recommended them to us, Green Empowerment and its local partner in Philippines, SIBAT, are currently conducting sustainable agriculture training for rural communities. The previous dormitory could only accommodate 6 people, so construction of a new dormitory and multi-purpose instruction hall has enabled them to accommodate approximately 16 people. With this facility, the total number of people benefiting from sustainable agriculture training continues to grow year-by-year, thereby helping to improve the health, nutrition, environment, and overall well-being of farmers and their local communities.

Project Type: 
Education
Infrastructure
Beneficiaries: 
Men
Women
Duration From: 
2011
Duration To: 
2012
Target Budget: 
$A2 000.00
Benefits so far: 

The construction of the ‘Sustainable Agriculture Training Center for Healthy Farmers, Better Food & Healthy Environment’ was completed in 2012. The Center was constructed with local materials and local manufacturing resources. The project funded by Meal-a-Day resulted in the construction of 2 dormitories and 2 bathrooms, one for men and one for women. The facility accommodates 16 total and allows SIBAT to conduct more in-depth, hands-on trainings. Center Manager, Marila Castro, was delighted with the new dormitories, "before, we literally slept on the tables in the conference area." She added that the trainings are now more effective because people are well-rested and they can accommodate additional trainees from across the country.

Working in partnership: 

As with all our projects, we work in partnership with communities on the ground and with well-established organizations, which share similar work ethic and objectives to us.

Meal-a-Day Americas have established a number of excellent projects with Green Empowerment in South America and recommend them to us. Green Empowerment provide renewable energy and water systems that alleviate poverty and improve the environment.

They empower impoverished communities by providing:

  • Clean water for household use and agriculture
  • Lighting and power for schools, health clinics, and community centres
  • Energy to run small businesses or for community uses like agricultural processing, radio communication, and refrigeration of medicines and medical supplies
  • Electricity for homes
  • Environmental conservation and protection, watershed restoration, and community self-sufficiency.
More Information: 

About our Meal-a-Day activities on-the-ground:

  • Contact our Project Coordinators, Jon and Sarah Fry

About the partner organization:

About the country:

Seeking Project Funding?

Please note that we currently have a full portfolio of projects and are not considering adding new projects at this time.  We regularly review our pipeline of activity and forecast budgets and expect there will be opportunities to expand and/or modify our portfolio according to community needs in the future.

Future Opportunities

When the opportunity arises, please be aware that to be able to consider your application most efficiently, you will need to complete the key information in the proposal form and cross-reference our Project Funding Principles.

If you are interested in establishing a partnership with Meal-a-Day in the future - please contact the Project Coordinator for your region.

Thank you.